A Guide to the Monica Lewinsky Story:

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LAST UPDATED: JULY 8, 2004

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A Guide to the Monica Lewinsky Story

GUIDE TO…
KENNETH STARR
VERNON JORDAN
LINDA TRIPP

Beginning in January of 1998, The Coffee Shop Times provided the Lewinsky Guide as an overview of developments in Kenneth Starr’s investigation of the relationship between President Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. However, once Kenneth Starr’s report was released by Congress on September 11, 1998, much of the information below became a matter of public record and was no longer based in news articles — many of which often relied on anonymous sourcing.

For the most part, CST’s “Guide to the Monica Lewinsky Story” is now an Internet news resource. Occasionally, new link postings will still appear on this page, but, for the most part, the story has run its course.

To maintain the story’s original feel, we will leave much of this page’s content as it was in the days before the release of the Starr Report.

Our “Guide to the Monica Lewinsky Story” is divided into three parts:
— Links to recent Lewinsky-related items on the Internet
— An overview of the players involved
— The legal ramifications of the investigation

If you have any questions or comments regarding CST’s “Guide to the Monica Lewinsky Story,” please send them via e-mail to The Coffee Shop Times.


AN OVERVIEW OF MONICA LEWINSKY:

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RELATED STORIES:
Clinton’s Aug. 17 Address
Judge Rejects Secret Service Privilege Claim
Excerpt from Kathleen Willey’s Interview with “60 Minutes”
Various White House Responses to Willey’s “60 Minutes” Interview
 Excerpt from Kathleen Willey’s Deposition to Paula Jones’ Lawyers
Excerpt from Clinton’s Deposition to Jones’ Lawyers Regarding Willey
Excerpt from Clinton’s Deposition to Jones’ Lawyers Regarding Lewinsky
Vernon Jordan’s Statement after his Second Day before the Grand Jury
White House Seeks Investigation of Leaks – Blames Starr
Kenneth Starr Outlines Conditions for Immunity
Linda Tripp’s Statement on Her Role in the Case
Excerpt from Janet Reno’s Request for an Expansion of Starr’s Investigation

Role: Signed an affidavit for Paula Jones’ lawyers in which she denied ever having an affair with the president. However, it has been reported that audiotapes exist in which she tells her friend Linda Tripp that she indeed had a lengthy affair with President Clinton. Reports also allege these audiotapes include conversations which hint that Ms. Lewinsky may have been instructed by the president and people close to him to deny that a sexual relationship ever existed between Lewinsky and the president.

According to a Jan. 29, 1998, Washington Post story, sources close to Ms. Lewinsky say she has told them the president had a private meeting with her on December 28, and suggested that she could avoid testifying in the Paula Jones case by going to New York City. He also allegedly told her that she could testify that her visits to the White House were to see his secretary. At the time of this meeting, Ms. Lewinsky had already been subpoenaed by Jones’ lawyers, but it is not clear whether the president knew this. She signed the affidavit ten days later.

The Clinton Administration has rejected press requests for entry logs which would contain documentation of any Lewinsky visits to the White House after leaving her job there in April of 1997. But many media organizations have reported that Ms. Lewinsky visited the White House 37 times after moving to her job at the Pentagon.

The New York Times reported on Feb. 6, 1998, that Betty Currie, the president’s personal secretary, has told the grand jury in Kenneth Starr’s investigation that the president and Ms. Lewinsky were sometimes alone during those visits.

Ms. Currie also turned over gifts to investigators which she had retrieved from Ms. Lewinsky. These were gifts the president had originally given to Ms. Lewinsky himself. Kenneth Starr is concerned that Ms. Currie may have been instructed by President Clinton to keep these gifts so that aspects of his relationship with Ms. Lewinsky would remain hidden.

According to a March 5 report in the Washington Post, the president told Paula Jones’ lawyers in his deposition that he may have been alone with Ms. Lewinsky a few times and that they exchanged modest gifts. Reportedly he did not dispute having given her a book, a hat pin, a broach and various souvenirs from Martha’s Vineyard.

A former Secret Service officer, Lewis C. Fox, has told the Washington Post that he was positioned outside the Oval Office door on a weekend in 1995 when Ms. Lewinsky went inside with paperwork and remained for at least 40 minutes alone with the president. With this Feb. 11, 1998, Post report, Fox became the first person to state publicly that he knows of a time when Lewinsky and Clinton were alone.

On Jan. 23, 1998, ABC News reported that Lewinsky may have had in her possession a blue dress–kept as a souvenir–which was stained with the semen of the president. The report says she mentioned the existence of the dress during her conversations with Ms. Tripp.

It has since been reported that Lewinsky turned over the dress to Starr’s team after cutting a transactional immunity deal for herself and her mother. Starr then turned over the dress to the FBI for DNA testing.

[DNA extracted from a vial of blood taken from the president turned out to match the DNA “fingerprint” taken from the semen on Ms. Lewinsky’s dress providing, for the purposes of the Starr Report, physical evidence of a sexual relationship between the president and Monica Lewinsky.]

On July 28, 1998, Monica Lewinsky’s lawyers announced that a transactional immunity deal had been struck for their client. Many news organizations reported that Ms. Lewinsky admitted to having a sexual relationship with the president during a meeting with prosecutors on July 27, 1998, in New York. It can be assumed that this admission by Ms. Lewinsky paved the way for what amounts to the broadest type of immunity a prosecutor can possibly grant.

In addition, Marcia Lewis, Ms. Lewinsky’s mother, was also granted the same level of immunity. Her grand jury testimony had been interrupted last February — probably because she wished to work out an immunity deal as well.

Background: Monica Lewinsky graduated with a degree in psychology from Lewis and Clark College in the spring of 1995. Shortly thereafter, she accepted an unpaid internship at the White House. As an intern, she worked under former chief of staff Leon Panetta. After that, she took a full-time job in the Clinton administration’s legislative affairs office. By the spring of 1996, according to The Washington Post, she obtained a job — with the help of White House officials — as the “confidential assistant, with top-secret clearance, to the Pentagon’s top spokesman.” The Post reports that this job paid $32,700. At the Pentagon she met and became friends with Linda Tripp who worked on a different floor but in the same department.


IMPEACHMENT ARTICLES AND THEIR POTENTIAL RAMIFICATIONS:

On Wednesday, September 9, 1998, Kenneth Starr’s Office of Independent Counsel delivered its report on the Lewinsky investigation to the House of Representatives for consideration. Within the report were 11 counts of possible impeachable offenses allegedly committed by the president. Among those counts were charges of perjury, obstruction of justice and abuse of power.

On Saturday, December 19, 1998, the House of Representatives passed two articles of impeachment against President Clinton — one regarding grand jury perjury, the other, obstruction of justice.

Grand Jury Perjury — Intentionally lying under oath about a fact material to the case under consideration.

During President Clinton’s grand jury testimony, he denied ever having had “sexual relations” — as defined in the Paula Jones sexual harassment case — with Monica Lewinsky, a White House intern and later, a White House employee. However, according to Monica Lewinsky’s grand jury testimony, the president’s activities during their meetings would have fallen within the parameters of the Jones case definition for sexual relations.

During a Senate trial, managers from the House of Representatives attempted to prove other instances of grand jury perjury as well.

By passing the article of impeachment regarding grand jury perjury, the House of Representatives determined that a President of the United States should be removed from office if he/she commits felonies (perjury) in an effort to win a civil court case.

Obstruction of Justice — Article alleged obstruction of justice, charging Clinton with encouraging Lewinsky to submit a false affidavit and give false testimony in court, plotting to hide his gifts to her, and attempting to find Lewinsky a job to prevent her truthful testimony. It also accused Clinton of making false and misleading statements to key White House staff and of allowing his attorney, Bob Bennett to make false statements about the Lewinsky affidavit.

MORE RESOURCE LINKS:

WHITE HOUSE REBUTTAL | CLINTON GRAND JURY TRANSCRIPT | LEWINSKY GRAND JURY TRANSCRIPT | NEW STARR RELEASE | 81 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS | EXPERTS TESTIFY ON IMPEACHMENT | HEARING TRANSCRIPTS: 2-DAY CLINTON DEFENSE | 184-PAGE CLINTON DEFENSE REPORT | CLINTON’S POST-IMPEACHMENT ADDRESS TO NATION | BIOS OF SENATE TRIAL MANAGERS | LEWINSKY DEPOSITION | JORDAN DEPOSITION | BLUMENTHAL DEPOSITION | MANAGERS’ CLOSING ARGUMENTS | PRESIDENT’S CLOSING DEFENSE

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